An Interview with Shandon Sahm

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Image Credit: Paul Hooper Photography (All Photos Courtesy of Shandon Sahm)

I’ve done a lot of interviews now and all of them have their own identity. They all have their own ebb and flow to them. Some are quick and sort of in and out. Some are more drawn out. At times, I get the opportunity to get to the know the artist a bit more, which is truly a humbling and unique experience each and every time it happens; it’s something that I’ll never take for granted. On a few occasions, these interviews become a true collaborative effort, which truly is something that has only happened a very small handful of times. Today, I’ve got one of those interviews for you.

Shandon Sahm is a lifer within the music biz. His roots in music trace back to before he was even born. His father was the late, great Doug Sahm, a genre-bending virtuoso musician who refused to play by anyone’s rules but his own. Through Doug’s time with Casablanca Records in the 70’s, Shandon has a deep-rooted connection and affection for KISS, which for me is always a plus. Beyond that, Shandon has forged his own musical legacy as a truly powerful drummer, who champions the groove, the pocket and vintage drums above anything else, and in doing so, he has played with the likes of Gibby Hayes and was also the long term drummer for the Meat Puppets, where he was a huge part of their most consistent and resonant work of their modern era. Like his dad, Shandon also knows what it’s like to be underrated, as his first band Pariah never achieved major commercial success, but in recent times has developed something of a cult following. This is the part where I mention that if you haven’t heard Pariah- then you need to hear Pariah. Seriously, go find a copy of their album To Mock a Killingbird.

Anyway, I’ve got Shandon Sahm with us today. This was truly a treat for me. Shandon gave in-depth and truly honest answers, and was even kind enough to provide pictures that illustrate both his career, and his history with his dad. If you would like to learn more about Shandon Sahm, head over to his Instagram here, or his Facebook here. Lastly, check out out his new CD Sahm Cover Sahm Vol. 2 and of course, don’t forget about Vol. 1 as well. Enjoy getting to know and learning more about Shandon Sahm. I know I did.

Andrew:
Shandon, thank you for taking the time to speak with us. This last year has been rough, right? How are you holding up during this seemingly ever-raging dumpster fire?

Shandon:
How am I holding up this year?? Hmmmm well…I’m just bored but my bills are paid. I understand that we are considered “entertainment,” and as such will be the last to open up, but in life I’ve learned nothing stays the same…it’ll shift. I’m recording new original music after doing 2 tribute CDs to my dad. The Sahm Covers Sahm Vol 1 EP and Vol 2 LP…they came out great! I’m digging living in Amsterdam; it’s a dream come true. I’ve been productive releasing a CD each year…so yes, like all musicians, I can’t wait to play, but it could be worse, really. I mean, famine and wars…I live in Holland and I know about what they did to survive WW2 so I’m very happy other than not playing, but actually I can on good sunny days…old school busk in Vondal Park for tips and sell CDs. Lately, that’s been my “club gigs” LOL. Haha. My new original music will be Rock and Roll side A, and side B will be Americana/Country, so you get two genres in one LP. It’s in vain of what Dad did before it was cool…what ever you want…they couldn’t pigeon hole sir dad.

All Photos Courtesy of Shandon Sahm

Andrew:
Tell us about your backstory. What was your musical gateway so to speak?

Shandon:
Well, I was born into a musical family…our dad was the leader of the Sir Douglas quintet, but before that he was a steel guitar prodigy and played or got to sit in with Hank Williams Sr. in Austin before he died. No pictures exist, but the advertisement of show in the paper. So, with music all around it was strange it took until my teens to know…when I started my first band Pariah, I actually think back now- music chose me and I’ve never given it up. I’m a musical lifer. I didn’t really know yet what I wanted to do, but in high school, Kyle Ellison and his brother asked me to play drums even though I never had a lesson. I learned on stage really. We played around, had no singer, so in the very beginning, I sang and played drums, then we got a singer and another guitar player and it happened fast when thinking about it and two years out of high school, we got signed to Geffen and my journey took off from there; not on a commercial level but it did show me that if you like it, stick with it. Repetition is the key. Out last the cockroaches. If anyone is interested and wants to learn more, I do have a Wikipedia page, because when it comes to music…it’s historical…it’s a long story. Also, if you’d like to read about dad, check out his Wikipedia page- Doug Sahm. Anyway, then meeting Curt from the Meat Puppets, and in late 90s, then in 2004 I played in Gibby’s Solo band called Gibby Haynes and his one really great self titled LP. Then after that, I ended up joining Meat Puppets a second time and now I’m a solo artist. In Nov 2019, I played ACL Fest as a solo artist…it was awesome…the sky’s the limit.

Andrew:
As a musician, who are some of your earliest and most important influences? How did you develop your signature style?

Well, I grew up around the club scene as a kid; it was like my day care, clubs like Soap Creek or Armadillo World HQ in Austin are where I’d play pinball or walk around while Dad played numerous sets, sometimes crashing on the club couch until he’d wake me up to go home. So, I had the club thing just by hanging around, but then as I got older, there was nothing to really do in in San Antonio except go check out arena Rock bands like Rush, Ratt, Van Halen, KISS and more. Then, I heard the big drum sounds and thought that’s not like how they sound in a club. So, right away the lights go down…the roar of crowd…then the drummer kicks in, then the kit sounds huge like Bonham and that was like, oh okay a little wake up. If you’ve got your influence right, everything you listen to should be a little blender of sounds you absorbed, then mix it to your own thing and it should be completely original yet kinda feel familiar, ya know what I’m saying?? I like what Jack White said, “Let the music tell you what to do, not other way around.” I thought that’s correct, because Dad (Doug Sahm) was so talented and thought the same thing. He didn’t play music, music played him. My first arena concert was KISS in ’79. Dad did a few tunes with Neill Bogart in ’75, so when KISS came to San Antonio, Texas in ’79, I got to meet them with and without makeup…that changed my life. These days, I now enjoy anything that has a pocket and groove; it’s all about the swing to me. So the music I listen to can be anywhere from classic Zeppelin, Stones, John Denver (killer guitar player) old KISS (’73 to ’79 only), The Cars, Gary Numan, Korn, Duran Duran, White Stripes, Jack White. Even sleep music…yes you heard that right LOL. Cheap Trick are my ultimate band. That said, no one can top The Beatles; if you ever wanna know how to write a song, just soak that up and you’ll be singing melodies all the time. Ringo is absolutely the best drummer ever…Bonham, too. Ringo had great timing and a cool back beat, but most of all, he played for what the song needed, which sounds easy but most drummers listen to themselves and not the entire band. Bonham was good in this way too…the execution, sound, big fat sounds. I also like the original Korn drummer, David Silveria- he’s sick. Anything that swings and grooves…I’m down.

Andrew:
Your dad was the totally awesome, and completely underrated Doug Sahm. Sir Douglas Quintet, Mendocino, and Dou Sahm and Band are legendary albums. How influential has your dad’s music been to you?

Shandon:
Just by being surrounded by music 24/7 was the first thing I learned about music without ever realizing it. I’d say dad’s more underground than underrated. I mean, he is a Musician’s Musician. But really, in a nut shell, because now it’s cool to do whatever you want, but back then it was hard to market him because what are you?? Guitar God?? Songwriter?? Blues?? Rock?? Back then, they say if he’d been a one trick pony then he would be easy to market. He changed record companies like you would socks. If he had had a team guiding him a little, he’d be a household name but what musician wouldn’t want to have a career like his? His music took him around the world. So, like Stevie Ray, he’s labeled as a Guitar God. Dad was all those but he did whatever he felt like, and was a true artist in that sense. Now, it’s acceptable to do that. Jack white can play in 3 different bands and play different instruments…I only wish my dad had seen his influence grow while he was alive, like Jack White has, but it has grown, and that’s a great thing. They credit him with laying the blue print for being the Godfather of Americana and Alt-Country. Yes, I wish he could have gotten a little more promotion, but everything he did get was because of talent. He also was on the cover of Rolling Stone magazine in 1968 with my brother (I wasn’t born yet), and then again in ’71. It’s well known that he’s Bob Dylan’s favorite musician and he’s influenced tons of great bands like Wilco. Actually, Rich and Chris Robinson from The Black Crowes are huge Doug fans, so it’s growing. Evan Dando covered him. Frank Black from the Pixies too. He’s a badass, awesome father and he’ll never be forgotten.

All Photos Courtesy of Shandon Sahm

Andrew:
You’re a KISS fan, right? My understanding is you were inspired by them early on. I myself am a lifelong KISS fan. What was it about their music that inspired you early on? What’s your favorite KISS record? Still into them today?

Shandon:
Okay….so….dad recorded two songs in ’75 for Casablanca. One was called “Roll With The Punches” and the other was “I’m Not That Kat Anymore.” So, they knew each other. I remember my very first song was “Kissin’ Time.” I liked the riff and it said the word “kiss”…I’d dance around, and dad brought home the first KISS record, which Neil (Bogart) gave him… that was ’76?? Anyway, man, Peter and Ace gave KISS attitude and swagger. I’m not into them today; it’s fake and on tape now…but Pete and Ace…KISS in general, made my childhood so fun. I’ve watched KISS Meets the Phantom of the Park a million times, and I can recite all the lines in the movie like, “Easy cat man, they are serious.” LOL. Ace was my favorite…man the guy can play. He had a great vibrato and tone you really can’t beat…a Gibson Les Paul through a Marshall…it’s heaven. Then, in ’79 I got to meet KISS during the Dynasty tour, both with and without make up. They were very nice then…when Ace came out of his dressing room (this is awesome) I was asking about his Dynasty costume, and he was eating peanuts and drunk as shit…then the lights suddenly go out and I’m like no Ace is my guy I’m going with him (I was 9 or 10) and get this…they let me walk beside Ace until he reached back of stage and then a roadie very politely whisked me away…but I remember looking up at my idol (imagine the Steelers/Coke commercial in ’70??)…it was very much like that and it blew my mind totally. Then the journey begins without me even knowing, and if that’s not cool enough…Gene wrote me a letter two days later. I’m blown out of the water…my all-time favorite band, and I got to meet them. Then there was this trippy connection with Dad and Neil Bogart which led to the meeting. Peter was amazing back in the day…his drum patterns are awesome. I think his best playing was from the first record through Love Gun. He’s got a great swing. I love Peter Criss. He’s not the most technical but I don’t care, it’s more about swing. The guy now, Eric Singer, he’s technically way better but his swing to me is stiff and he overplays those classic licks like it’s below him. Understand this, I love what KISS gave us, great art and music but I would never go see fake KISS. Having said that…I would pay money to see a version of KISS with a fake Gene and Paul, with the real Ace and Peter! LOL. That I’d pay big money for.

Andrew:
Let’s talk about Pariah. What a cool band. You guys did a record for Geffen, To Mock a Killingbird, and then that was kind of it, right? Why did Pariah come to an end?

Shandon:
We started out in high school; the nucleus was me and the Ellison brothers. Then, once we got a singer and second guitar, the line up was completed. We were just kids playing, and then it got popular. We got signed to Geffen Records when the label was just starting out. The guy that signed us was Tom Zutaut. You probably know him from Motley Crue and Guns ‘N’ Roses…same A&R guy. Anyway, we got lost in shuffle and it was a few years before we actually made our debut record in mid ’93, but by then, music had shifted and I actually think the demos we did were better than the actual debut LP. Anyway, by ’95 Geffen dropped us, then our Bass player Sims Ellison took his own life shortly after. It was sad. Sims was a beautiful dude. I guess…maybe…we put our eggs in one basket. It was lame how it imploded. Looking back, we should have went with Chrysalis Records; they wanted us bad. Now get this…the guy that wanted to sign us was half owner of MTV- John Sykes (not the guitar player). We were young and shot a little too high. We should have went with John, he had a plan for us, but Geffen gave us a bigger advance, so I think that’s why we ended up with Geffen. Tom had Guns, Motley Crue…too many bands at once. It was awesome being at Conway studios in LA…same drum room that they did Motley Crue’s record Girls Girls Girls. We used the drum doctor and spent 3 thousand dollars a day for 3 months, to a rent car and a two bedroom apt in LA. I’ll never forget it. Last thing to make good of a bad situation, Sims Foundation in Austin was created to help musicians with depression (link here).

Andrew:
You actually had the chance to drum on some of your dad’s later work in the 90s, right? What was it like working alongside him on Day Dreaming at Midnight (which is a really cool latter career album by the way)?

Shandon:
This is a cool story…it involves Q Prime Metallica honcho Cliff Burnstein, the older guy you see in studio videos helping with their songs and direction. So, Cliff heard Doug Sahm and sons’ track off the Rocky Erickson tribute CD (fantastic) with ZZ Top, Butthole Surfers and others. He had heard our version of “You’re Gonna Miss Me,” liked it and found dad. That’s why it’s on Elektra Records. It actually was supposed to be a side project called Daddy’s Little Monsters but somehow it became a SDQ record so I drummed on two songs. I was recording in LA with Pariah around the same time, and it was great. Dad hung out a lot in and around LA; he was proud that his son was working and actually signed to a label. My brother did a lot of guitars and background vocals on that record, and you can really hear him on the title track. It’s a great LP. It did well in Europe but not so much in the USA. They also had John Jorgenson – a rad player – along on guitar too. Doug Clifford is on that record too. Him and dad went way back…actually how they first met was The Goliwogs opened for SDQ before they were CCR. Sooo much musical history. Watching Cosmo drum was a thrill, he’s a total swing/pocket man. John Fogerty may have wrote the songs, but he wouldn’t have that swing without the other three. Cosmo is awesome and his drumming is iconic. He also uses two 18″ crash for his high-hat. That’s the unique sound and his execution was spot on. Day Dreaming at Midnight is becoming a fast classic. A lot of dad’s best records didn’t do well on a commercial level, but those LPs are so great that to any Doug fan…it’s a staple.

All Photos Courtesy of Shandon Sahm

Andrew:
You had a couple of stints with the Meat Puppets, finally calling it quits with them for a second time in 2018. How did you get the gig with them? How was it working with the Kirkwood brothers, and why did you end up leaving in the end?

Shandon:
I actually have Kyle Ellison thanks to my Pariah buddy. He’s responsible for me even being in Meat Puppets. He played their No Joke! tour as a second guitar player. So, when they went on hiatus, Curt ended up moving to Austin in ’98 and him and Kyle started writing songs, most of which would end up on Atlantic Records’ side company Breaking Records, who was owned by Hootie & the Blowfish…true story. Anyway, Curt and Kyle started getting the band going again and asked me to play drums. Then we got our good friend Andrew on Bass, who had just started touring with Bob Mould and that was the lineup. Looking back on some of the albums…Rat Farm was done totally live, all three of us playing together, but Lollipop was all studio recorded, with me and Curt cutting the tracks together there. Those are two proud moments for me. I give Curt lots of credit, his band at the time was non-functional and he’s the captain of that ship. So, we practiced, played and toured. That lasted from ’99 to 2001. So, we all got inducted into the Arizona Hall of Fame and then we went out on a few California shows with X. I always thought it was Derrick’s (Bostrom) seat. He built that band and paid dues, but I understand you can get burnt out like he did in ’96. I felt that way too but it was everything. Still, I was house poor on top of touring and Curt would be gracious and advance me, but it got to where I was working off what he already advanced me, now this might be a shock but to me, I understand the biz. Curt gets all the credit for keeping it going in rough times, but he had a band that was good and functional, but now the surprise.

Fast forward to recent times: I recorded drums for Dusty Notes but when Derrick Bostrom got back in the band, Curt erased my parts and put Derrick on the record instead. So, somewhere out there (online maybe?) Curt knows there might be a version, or a rough mix of that LP with my drum sounds on it. I do remember the drums sounded great. I used my Slingerland snare. The drum sounds were so cool. I got inspired and left a few drum beats down for Curt to use. I’ll give you a hint of something cool after I recorded drums: Ron the keyboardists put a few ideas to my drum patterns and I swear to God it sounded like Meat Puppets meets Deep Purple “Highway Star” vibes. That’s my last memory. I do remember Curt saying he’d love to sometime do an Allman Brothers thing with two drummers.

I respect Curt. Like I said, he kept it going and I actually never wanted to leave, but could just tell things were shifting. Let me put it this way, I love the Meat Puppets. I never missed one show and my track record speaks for itself. I’d help him out tomorrow if he needed me, but not without having a long talk. That’s it in a nutshell. It’s actually no different than other band things that go on, so it’s not a big deal. Underneath, I’ll always work on being a great musician. I’m working on new original music after doing 2 tribute CDs dedicated to dad. Those sessions I did in 2009 were how I got back in after asking Curt if he wanted to play on the Sahm Covers Sahm. After that, he called me and we went out with Stone Temple Pilots…those were my first gigs back. So again, it’s all good. I have no ill feelings and like I said, I’d help him out anytime because I truly love the guy, Cris too. So, it’s just things that happen in bands sometimes. I knew what my job was, it was to keep them touring as a kick ass band and I’m proud to be a part of their history. I’m truly humbled.

So, what I do now is make my own music. I have a great band in Texas and then every few years, I do get offers to play drums, but only if conditions are right. Look, I’m not gonna just go to Austin 6th street and set up my drums. It has to be worth it. Until then, I make my music but as a little bonus, because I know people do enjoy my drumming. Now, when you come see us, I do kind of a Dave Grohl thing. I front the band, play acoustic guitar and let my awesome band rock out, then on a song or two, I’ll actually get behind the kit and sing and play as an added bonus. So, it feels natural and it’s coming along great as a solo artist. I got to play the 2019 ACL Fest and it was amazing, but then COVID hit. I’m a musical lifer. I’m not going anywhere. So, we wait it out. My bills are paid. It could be worse. 

All Photos Courtesy of Shandon Sahm

Andrew:
Let’s talk current events a bit. In 2019, and 2020 respectively, you released Sahm Covers Sahm and Sahm Covers Sahm Vol.2 which has some really great renditions of your dad’s solo material. Tell us about the recording of those albums? What led you to finally cover your dad’s music?

Shandon:
I’ve always wanted to do a tribute and the Vol 2 sessions were recorded in Austin, in 2009 and then finally finished in 2019, because I was busy with the Meat Puppets. I put it aside but knew it was special, because it was with Kirkwood and my Dutch friend Eric Van Den Brink, West Side Horns and a bunch of my favorite musicians in Austin. The guys that helped me get this out, Ralf Almar’ Nijholt, they also play some great stuff on the CD. I had basics done and just had to polish it up, sing and add percussion. It’s been a labor of love and I’ll do tribute shows honoring his music because people still wanna hear it. Now, I’m working on original music and hopefully it will be out before the end of the year. I really like the production on Vol 2 though, the performances too. So, I’m way proud of how it turned out. Once things open up again, I’ll tour Texas on that CD. So, I’ll actually have the Vol 1 EP and Vol 2 CDs for sale at the shows. It’s very natural. I really concentrate on singing and playing a tight rhythm, and channel my inner Malcolm Young, but having a great band helps too. I’m really happy with the way things are going, and now we just need to get back to playing again. I hope to stay very busy. I added a back up singer too. She’s really great and gives it that Tina Turner kinda soulful vocal sound. My band back in Texas is Gary First on drums, Heather Bishop on backing vocals, Danny G on guitar, Tony Nobles on keys and steel guitar. I am proud to play with such good people and awesome musicians. The bass player hasn’t been chosen yet, but I have lots of people in mind…basically get someone to do the tour…the sky’s the limit

Andrew:
Let’s talk about the state of the music industry a bit. What are a few things you would like to see change for the betterment of both the fans and artists alike?

Shandon:
Well, it used to be called music “biz,” but now it’s the music “industry.” That says a lot. It’s actually great in the sense there’s no rules anymore, and you don’t have to be a certain age or whatever. Now, it’s wide open and anything can get your band attention. These days, lots of views or selling ten twenty thousand CDs on your own…that’s success. I think (bands like) Nirvana didn’t really kill anything (genres), it just scenes get exhausted and become silly. I mean, there’s good and bad in every genre, it’s just more fake now. These days, you really don’t know if it’s on tape (pre-recorded) or not, all or almost all are digital nowadays. It’s sad. I like raw; give me a little mistakes, it’s okay. Go back and listen to early KISS, Gene messes up a lot, but they are so hungry and driven that you looked right past it, but it’s actually great. Now, big shows it’s almost all on tape more than ever before. Recording is all about mic placement, Pro Tools is cool but don’t overdo it or use vintage mics. I used to say what if the Beatles had Pro Tools?

Image Credit: John Chapman (All Photos Courtesy of Shandon Sahm)

Andrew:
In a world dominated by capitalism and social media, can indie artists really, truly get ahead? How do we keep the playing field level so that everyone has a chance to succeed?

It’s simple really…outlast the poseurs and cockroaches. Repeat and never give up. If I had quit after ’95 when Pariah broke up, I wouldn’t have had played with Gibby Haynes or the Meat Puppets. It’s so open but you gotta be persistent. You’ll be broke before you see any money. I don’t mind people selling merch either. For example, KISS had great merch, toys, trash cans, everything. I have nothing against that but it can go too far. I liked the dolls and viewfinders but that KISS casket is just awful and silly. So, I’m down with whatever. Again, there never should be rules as an artist, they’re made to be broken. Everything has been done, so your approach is everything and anything.

Andrew:
Are you into records? Tapes? CDs? Digital? Where do you like to shop for music?

Sure. Vinyl is like an original painting, but digital is like a reproduction of that original painting. That said, I actually like all forms of audio. When CDs first came out, I really liked them but now records are like an audio painting, they shimmer more. Let’s bring back the 8 track tape. LOL. Shopping for music…man…I still like record stores. It’s becoming few and far between, but that’s my favorite…just looking around finding gems. Nothing like a great set of earphones either. You can’t duplicate a live show, but they are close. Still, they’re nothing like being there in the action. Music is my passion and I’ve listened to tons of it. Whenever I crave melody, I always go to The Beatles. We’ve come a long way, I know it’s harder on tape, but I think the reward is in the final product. Tape is best when recording, it just has that sound; nothing beats true hi-fi analog.

Andrew:
Who are some of your favorite artists? Ones that mean the most to you.

Shandon:
Way too many to mention but I’ll try. KISS, any record from ’73 to ’79. All Zeppelin. The Meat Puppets. Gary Numan Pleasure Principle. The first album by The Cars. Another…actually it’s from 2015 by Cage The Elephant, Tell Me I’m Pretty. It’s amazing. Best record since Nirvana’s Nevermind. Every tune is fantastic. It sounds produced, but not overdone. I dig Jack White’s stuff. Duran Duran, Korn, Beatles (everything), GG Allin, Blur, Adam Ant. Basically, anything that grooves and has a pocket. Cheap Trick, the first record all the way to One On One. CCR, Butthole Surfers, John Denver, Michael Jackson, old style County and Western. Old Van Halen, first record to 1984. Killing Joke, Devo…there’s plenty more but I think that gives you a good idea.

All Photos Courtesy of Shandon Sahm

Andrew:
What type of drums, cymbals and gear are you using these days?

Shandon:
I have now a Gretch Katalina kit and it’s awesome. The kick is 18″ but it’s off the floor and the doesn’t muffle. It’s wide open and sounds like a 22″. I used to have Vistalite like Bonham. I love the black beauty snare. Love my ’63 Slingerland and both my Katalina kit and my ’63 snare can be heard on YouTube. Philly Underground Arts 2017, that’s a great representation of my sound. Sabian cymbals and wood sticks.

Andrew:
Those who “get it” and are in the know so to speak, know all about your dad’s legacy. That said, you’ve created an amazing body of work for yourself too. Looking back on your career, for you, what’s your legacy? What are your proudest moments?

Shandon:
I don’t really think about it because I’m not into believing your own hype. I just forge ahead and when I do listen or look back, I’m proud for sure but I’ve done this long enough to know that adulating doesn’t affect me because I’m a fan of music. So, if someone comes up and is happy, talking about dad or the Meat Puppets, I’m totally down. I just do what I do. As a fan, I can totally relate to what it’s like to meet someone you admire, but too many to list: opening for Soundgarden, Foo Fighters, Sonic Youth…the list goes on. One time, when touring with Gibby Haynes, he stayed at his friend’ pad, and he goes, “My friend John is coming over…” – it was Frusciante from the Red Hot Chili Peppers…it was cool meeting him. I was watching a KISS ’76 Roosevelt Stadium show on DVD, and after awhile, John poked his head in and asked what I was watching. When I told him he’s like “Awesome, can I join?” So, John Frusciante and I were just sitting there, checking out a classic KISS concert, way cool. I’ve had adventures, hanging with the Soundgarden guys backstage…talking to Chris Cornell about demos verses the actual released LP. I’m a lifer. I play my music, and whenever something good comes along drum wise, I’ll always check it out. I’m a musician. I do text Gibby sometimes and say, “Anytime ya wanna start a project…” He’s super talented. I guess…one thing’s for sure, I’m glad to have had the opportunity to play with some super talented musicians because that’s really what gets me off in the end. I just enjoy the whole thing, recording, promotion, live shows….all of it.

Andrew:
Last question. You’ve maintained a strong DIY approach throughout your career, which is awesome. That said, what advice would you have for young artists just starting out? How do bands stay afloat in a world that seems to be so abhorrent to creatives?

Shandon:
There are no rules whenever you create art or at least…you shouldn’t have rules. Sure you’ve got an idea, but true great art and music just kinda plays itself. Let the music guide you, and by doing that, it’ll be amazing and less stressful. Just channel it and it’ll come. Also, persistence is truly the key, you never know when you’ll make it….whatever that means. Whenever the time is right, it’ll happen. One thing I learned is that life’s all about timing, like when Pariah came out the timing wasn’t good, it’s like the stars align and that’s a rare thing but that’s what I shoot for. Thanks for everyone’s support. I am hopeful I’ll tour the USA/Texas mid 2021. I’m always grateful to do interviews like this so thanks for helping spread the word on great music… it’s truly about the music first. The girls and whatever else you want after a show, that’s secondary. I mean, if you play a good show, and the gals wanna hang out with you, and the guys wanna smoke their pot with you, that’s the joy of a job well done. Like they say, it’s only Rock ‘N’ Roll but I like it. Thanks! Follow me on Instagram or Facebook/Shandon Sahm or http://www.shandonsahm.com will be up and running soon.

All Photos Courtesy of Shandon Sahm

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About Post Author

Andrew Daly

Since he was a young child growing up on Long Island, NY, Andrew has always loved writing and collecting physical music. Present-day, Andrew is proud to share his love of music with the world through his writing, and the result is nothing short of beautiful: articles and interviews written by a music addict for fellow music addicts. Andrew lives on Long Island and works as a Horticultural Operations Manager by day and runs the Vinyl Writer Music website by night.
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