An Interview with Greg D’Angelo of White Lion

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Amid a budding New York music scene, Greg D’Angelo hardly experienced a shortage of labor in the early 1980s.

Whether it was teaming up with Scott Ian to form an early configuration of Anthrax, navigating the club circuit with Cities, or appearing on Jack Starr’s Rock the American Way, D’Angelo was always on the move.

It wasn’t until auditioning for, and securing, the spot behind the kit for New York’s own White Lion in 1985, that he found stability.

D’Angelo, who joined forces with frontman Mike Tramp, guitarist Vito Bratta — and eventually, bassist James LoMenzo – proved to be a formidable complementary piece to the ultra-talented quartet.

Two years later, White Lion’s sophomore effort, Pride, achieved double platinum status, which effectively propelled the band towards Rock & Roll stardom. D’Angelo, who provided timely, appropriate — albeit thunderous — drum fills, stuck around for the final two albums before departing with LoMenzo at the conclusion of the European leg of the Mane Attraction Tour in 1991.

I recently sat down with Greg D’Angelo to discuss, among other things, the talent-laden New York club circuit, his tenure with White Lion, navigating the 90s, recent endeavors, and more.

Andrew:
Who are some of your most prominent drumming influences, and what was it about playing the drums that you were drawn to?

Greg:
I wanted to play drums ever since my earliest memories, so there’s nothing that really lead me to it; it was kind of inherent. It kind of chose me. I can’t ever remember a time where I didn’t want to play drums, from my earliest memories of pulling out my mom’s pots and pans and being cognizant of what a drum set looked like and trying to set up the pots and pans like that. I’d go through her wooden spoons, which she was never very happy about.

I guess it started with Ringo; my first record was Abbey Road. So, just by happenstance, Ringo came onto my radar probably before anybody else did. Luckily for me, it was [Ringo], because he’s such a fantastic drummer. As the years have progressed and I’ve listened to what’s appropriate for a song, and after spending a lot of years producing, I’ve come to appreciate him more and more. It’s like the older I get, the better he gets.

There were a ton of drummers who made a big difference in my development. Alex Van Halen – Van Halen, period – was just a huge influence. Rush, like every 14-year-old kid, I just loved Neil Peart; back before we had CDs or the ability to slow things down, just picking up the needle and dropping it back and trying to figure out what the hell he was doing. Then, really, the English guys from the 70s; Cozy Powell, Simon Kirk from Bad Company, Ian Paice, and most importantly, probably over and above everyone else, is [John] Bonham. He was the guy that just supercharged my desire. Again, the older I get, the better he gets.

Aside from that, there were a lot of Jazz guys that I liked; Loved Tony Williams; Max Roach, I paid a lot of attention to him; Art Blakey; Buddy Rich, of course. You can’t talk about drummers without mentioning Buddy Rich. It’s really funny, too, especially the 70s English guys — the more you listen — the more I hear Buddy Rich in their playing, especially Bonham, Powell, and Paice. You hear those licks, and they’re straight from Buddy.

Andrew:
Some may not realize this, Greg, but you were once a member of Anthrax in the early days. What can you tell us about that period of your musical journey?

Greg:
Well, I was born in Brooklyn, but I grew up in Queens. I played in local bar bands from the time I was about 14 years old on. When I was 17, I joined Anthrax and stayed with them for about a year-and-a-half, two years; recorded some demos with them and played a bunch of shows with them. We did Metallica’s first East Coast tour.

Scott [Ian] and I were good friends. We used to spend a lot of time going to concerts together and going up to Jon Zazula’s, so Scott, Danny, and I used to drive out to the Old Bridge Flea Market. [Jon] rented a little space in an indoor warehouse kind of thing, where everybody was selling their stuff. He had this record shop, where he was selling imports; we had kind of heard of the bands and had images of the bands because of looking at magazines from overseas but never really heard them. Jonny made that stuff available, and it was like a whole new window into what was going on. He was the guy that brought Metallica out from the West Coast. I remember when he told us, “Oh, yeah, I’m bringing this band back called Metallica,” and his face just lit up.

After the Anthrax thing, I bopped around New York City doing independent work for about a year or so.

Andrew:
What prompted the Anthrax departure?

Greg:
There was another band that we were playing with, actually at L’Amour; I met those guys at L’Amour. It was a band called Cities; they were from Staten Island, and they had a great guitar player. I saw it as an opportunity for me to become a better player, honestly. They were going to challenge me a little bit more. I decided to make the move and join that band. I stayed with them for a couple of years.

Cities was a big commitment; I used to travel an hour to and from rehearsal, from Queens to Staten Island, almost every day or every other day. I did that for a couple of years. It was well worth it; it was a great experience.

Andrew:
I’m fascinated by the wealth of ascending talent the New York club circuit had to offer. You had Cities, you had Dreamer, just to name a couple of bands. How competitive was that scene at the time?

Greg:
You know, it didn’t really feel competitive as much as it felt like a well-fertilized plot where everybody could go and grow, learn, take from the other bands, and figure out what you could do to make yourself better. Amongst drummers, there isn’t that competition thing like there is amongst guitar players; it’s more of a brotherhood with drummers. I never really saw it as, “Oh, we gotta get it before they do.” It was a pretty rich community, and there were a lot of bands getting attention and getting signed. You could kinda see the bands that used to bring their ‘A’ game. We used to watch Kix all the time, and those guys were by far one of the best bands traveling between Boston and D.C. They had an incredibly tight show; to this day, they do. We spent some time with them and played with them quite a few times. I’m trying to think of the other bands that were really good –there was a band called T.T. Quick; that was a great band.

And then, I was lucky enough to grow up on Long Island. I used to go East, too; away from the city. I used to see The Good Rats; in fact, Joe Franco pretty much taught me how to play drums. I used to be able to see him from the time I was 14 up. Used to see Bobby Rondinelli from Rainbow when he was playing around town. Talk about keeping the bar high — if you wanted to achieve, you had to aim to be that good. It was a really high bar.

Andrew:
You also played on Jack Starr’s Rock the American Way with Bruno Ravel, who later joined Danger Danger.

Greg:
Right, right; Bruno was actually in White Lion for about six months, too, between Dave Spitz and [James] LoMenzo, and he split to join Danger Danger. But yeah, Bruno and I played on Jack Starr’s record, but it was two weeks; we did some rehearsals and then recorded the stuff in a few days, and that was it.

Andrew:
Nicky Capozzi played drums on White Lion’s debut album, Fight to Survive, but you joined the band on the heels of its release in 1985. Take me through the audition process.

Greg:
I have very clear memories of the audition. Oddly enough, I think I was one of the last guys to hear about the opening. I think I was actually at a Met game with Bruno Ravel when I found out that they were looking for a drummer. That same day or the day after, I saw an ad in the [Village] Voice. It said something like, “Looking for double bass drummer, must do this, good gear, all that kind of stuff.” So, I answered the ad, and at the same time I got a call from their management company, specifically George Parente, who was one of the owners of L’Amour and he was also one of the managers for White Lion. He said, “Hey, we’ve been looking for you. Do you wanna come down and give this a shot?” I think I was the last guy in. I went down, played, and it was evident pretty quickly that it was gonna work out – at least in my mind. So, I spent some time with them, came back, learned some more of their tunes, brought my kit and played. Then they offered me the slot.

Andrew:
I imagine that scene was such a tight-knit community. So, did you already know Vito and those guys when you went for the audition?

Greg:
I didn’t know Vito; I had seen his band play before, and I had great respect for him. I was aware of Mike because, even before the Anthrax days, when you used to come off of the Queensboro Bridge into Manhattan, there were these utility boxes on the left side – on the driver’s side when you’re coming off the bridge — that was always plastered with flyers. One of the flyers that were there for months was for Mike’s band, Lion. He had on this studded eye cover, this studded eyeshade, and I think he was biting an arrow or something like that; that’s kind of what I remember. I was looking at this guy like, “Oh, Jesus. What the hell is that?”

Then, I went to see White Lion with Mike, Vito, and Nicky. Saw Mike’s presence on stage and said, “Jesus Christ. This guy is gonna be on the cover of Circus.” That was probably maybe six months before they decided to change out their drummer – actually their whole rhythm section – because Felix Robinson was playing bass initially. He departed as well, and Dave Spitz came in and took Felix’s spot prior to my joining.

Andrew:
What was the vibe of the band like when you joined?

Greg:
Honestly, it was a little bit down. The band had to deal with Electra, the record got shelved, and they were kind of at a loss. I think that probably was one of the reasons why they decided to make a change. I don’t know who quit, who was fired, or what back in the day with their old rhythm section, but it was a little bit of a bummer. They were looking for, “Okay, we need new energy. We need to plug this thing in. We need to get it going.” God bless Mike and Vito; they stuck in there and found the energy to do so because that’s a pretty big blow — you go and you record a record with a major label and you’re expecting to at least get a shot and they shelve the record and they wouldn’t sell the record. They wouldn’t even release it to a third party for a really long time, so it was kind of like we were in limbo.

So, we rehearsed every day, five days a week. We played our circuit every three months between D.C and Boston — there were maybe half a dozen places we would hit — and wrote the Pride record. It was about two years of doing that.

Andrew:
How would you describe your drumming style?

Greg:
Getting simpler every day [laughs]. Even back then, I was kind of aware of – and honestly, I think that’s one of the reasons that I probably got the gig — was I played big open fills. I didn’t try to do stuff that was inappropriate to the song to be flashy; I wanted to support the song. Really, ever since those early days, that is what I think of. As time has gone on, and I’ve owned a studio, made records for other people, and produced other drummers, that’s one thing that I’m always really sensitive to – that the drummer is playing the appropriate stuff, that it’s not going to take away from the lyric or the melody or distract from anything that is really integral to the song.

Andrew:
Pride was the record that ultimately vaulted White Lion to new heights. Do you have any recollection of the recording process?

Greg:
It was the first we came to California. Four New York City kids growing up in Brooklyn, to have the opportunity to come out to California where the sun is always shining was kind of like, “Wait a minute. We could live here!?” Personally speaking, I’ve never left.

We showed up at Warner Bros Studios, the old Warner Bros Amigo Studios in North Hollywood, and we were very well prepared. The recording went very quickly, and we had a great time; everything was new.

Andrew:
I can remember listening to an interview with Vito that dates back close to 15 years ago now. [Producer] Michael Wagener actually called in and recounted how Vito nailed the “Wait” solo in one take during rehearsal — which is the one that’s on the record!

Greg:
That wouldn’t surprise me. Vito was pretty consistent and he had always done his homework. It wasn’t guesswork; everything that Vito played was planned out. He didn’t leave it to chance.

Andrew:
Speaking of Michael Wagener, what was it like working with a producer of his pedigree?

Greg:
He was great. We really did have a choice of which producers we wanted to go with, and [Michael] was at the top of our list. He had done the T.T. Quick record [Metal of Honor], and he had done [Dokken’s] Under Lock and Key, which was a record that we really paid a lot of attention to; that was the direction we were aiming for. Our record came out a little bit different, a little wetter, I think. But he was very efficient; he was acting as an engineer as well as producer. He had been in that room – that was kind of his homeroom – so him dialing things up took no time at all. He was as prepared, if not more so than we were. So, it was a very smooth process.

Andrew:
It took a bit for “Wait” to gain some traction on MTV, but once it did, the video was in constant rotation. What do you recall from the recording of that?

Greg:
We recorded that at the Puck Building in New York City; it’s a landmark building now. It was the top floor of the building. Marc Reshovsky was the director, and he went on to do features. It was either a day or two days of filming; if you look at the video, you could see that there were daylight scenes and there were nighttime scenes. Then [Marc] did some off-scenes with just he, Mike, and the girl that was in the video [Christie Muhaw]. It took a minute for it to catch at MTV … for them to make the decision between them and the label that we were gonna get a shove. While we made the video, it kind of sat there for a minute. We went to Europe, and while we were in Europe, our management said, “Listen, the video is in rotation. You’re going to see a huge difference when you get home.” It took a minute for us to get our momentum going with that record; probably 6-8 months if I had to guess.

Andrew:
So, was the big tour from the album the one with Aerosmith or the KISS Crazy Nights Tour?

Greg:
It was both; KISS was the first major act to take us out as an opener. We had toured with Ace Frehley, and we were doing theaters and clubs, but the first proper arena tour that we did was with KISS for the Crazy Nights record. Paul and Gene were kind enough to take a shot on us.

Andrew:
That’s incredible. What was it like being out on the road with KISS?

Greg:
Well, KISS was kind of like my gateway drug into heavy music. After listening to the Beatles and stuff, I kind of discovered KISS, and I said, “Oh, that’s what a Les Paul through a Marshall sounds like.” For me, I was tongue-tied, honestly; I probably embarrassed the hell out of myself because I didn’t know how to talk to them. I was beside myself; it was just the greatest thing in the world.

Andrew:
Is there a particular memory that sticks out from the Crazy Nights tour?

Greg:
I have a lot of memories from that tour. I had known Eric [Carr] from the New York club scene, and just being out and about, we were friendly. He was super kind and very supportive, as were Gene and Paul; they always seemed like they were glad to have us aboard. Over the course of those few weeks that we were out with them, we got to be in their presence a little bit, soaked it all in, and said, “Okay, this is how you conduct yourself. This is how this goes.” It was an education.

Image Credit: Joe Schaeffer Photography

Andrew:
How was the support from Atlantic at that time?

Greg:
When they decided to support us, it was a locomotive. It’s ironic because we were going up to the offices on a pretty regular basis and saying, “Listen, we’ll get on the phones, if you want us to talk to radio stations if we need to talk to promotors – whatever we need to do to make this work we’re gonna do.” So, we would show up, and we developed relationships with some of the directors and managers at the label, and we would socialize after work. I remember going out to some bar or club with one of the directors after work one night, and she said, “You don’t know what happened today. Wait until you see what kind of big push you’re gonna get.” I said, “Why, what happened?” And this was 1987, I believe; probably late in the year, right before we went to Europe. She said, “We had a meeting today to figure out which of the records that we’ve made this year we’re gonna push.” There were four of them: INXS, Robert Plant’s latest record, Debbie Gibson’s latest record, and Pride. I said, “Oh, that’s great,” not knowing exactly what that meant at the time, but it became very apparent when we got back from Europe, and we were all over the place. Once they decided that they were going to get behind that record, there was no stopping it.

Andrew:
As immensely successful as Pride ended up becoming, I can’t help but imagine the pressure you all must have felt to duplicate that success. Talk about some of the challenges you encountered during the production of Big Game.

Greg:
Well, interestingly enough, the last single that we got off of Pride was “When the Children Cry.” It was really late in the game and kind of a Hail Mary. We were like, “Are we gonna do this? There’s not a lot of money. Should we do a video?”“Yeah, let’s see what happens.” And it wound up being very successful, so much so that Atlantic wanted to capitalize on the momentum that we had from that top-10 single, so they were really pressuring us to get the record out. We were touring, playing our set, and trying to come up with new tunes on the road. We took a very, very short break, and then James LoMenzo and I went back to New York and met with Vito – because we were living out in California by that point. Got into a rehearsal room for a couple of weeks and basically went through some rudimentary arrangements of the songs he had written. We hadn’t really heard the vocals; we weren’t sure what was gonna happen with those because Mike wasn’t with us at that point. We went in and basically cut those demos. It was a little bit rushed, honestly. I think that we could have used a little bit more time, but we were listening to what the grown-ups are telling us to do … “We need that record yesterday.” So, we got it done.

The record’s got some great high points on it, as well. Radar Love was a pleasure, both the video and audio part of it. There’s a lot of moments on that record, especially if I were to go back and listen to it, that I was really proud of. The music on “Let’s Get Crazy” was a lot of fun for us to play; that became our opener on the subsequent tour. Radar Love was the No. 1 video with a drum solo. That’s what every drummer looks for, right?

Andrew:
The “Radar Love” video felt like a trailer for a motion picture! That drum solo was special, by the way. How did you come up with that?

Greg:
We had a pretty unlimited budget, and we went to town. We had helicopters, exotic cars, women, extras, actors, and all the stuff that costs a ton of money. I don’t know if a video like that would even be made today, honestly. It was over a few days and was great fun.

The drum solo was something that I think I came up with pretty quickly because initially, I was doing something similar to what the guy in Golden Earring played; some kind of Jungle Tom kind of thing. Producer Michael Wagener said, “Look, that’s great, and it sounds great, and if that’s what you want to do, we can do that. But you’ve got a chance to showcase yourself here and showcase your playing a little bit. Why don’t you come up with something on your own?” I went back and overnight and came up with that solo and played it the next day, and he just said, “That’s it. Perfect.” So, I have to thank him a lot for encouraging me to do that.

Andrew:
You alluded to the band feeling hurried and a bit pressured during the creative process for Big Game. As a result, Mane Attraction was strategically a more gradual process, and each song seemed a bit heavier and more intricate compared to previous albums.

Greg:
I think we kind of felt, and I think the label kind of felt, that we had gotten as far with Michael as we were gonna go at that point, and we just needed new input to get some new creativity. Richie Zito was [Billboard’s] Producer of the Year that year [1990]. He was probably the most politically tied-in cat in the music business that I had ever met; he knew everybody. He brought us into A&M, which was probably one of the best studios in town at that point. We had a separate engineer, so Richie really thought about the songs more; he didn’t have to worry about making sure the record sounded good. We had Phil Kaffel engineering for us, and he did a wonderful job.  Richie thought about the songs, he thought about what the lyrics were saying a little bit more, he thought about the arrangements, he thought about what he could do to quote-on-quote produce the band a little bit more, and we just took a hell of a lot of time. We tried different drums, different drum sets, different sounds, different positions. We were probably in A&M Studios just experimenting for a couple of weeks before we even hit the record button.

Andrew:
“Lights and Thunder” is my favorite song from the White Lion catalog. It’s quite complex and reminds me a bit of “Achilles Last Stand.” What was the concept for that song, and where did the drumming inspiration come from?

Greg:
It probably started with Vito’s riff, if I had to guess; I don’t remember specifically, but I’m sure that’s where it started. And I would think that the riff kind of inspired Mike’s lyrics. “Song Remains the Same” is definitely where I got the inspiration for the drums on that track. Oddly enough, I was living next door to Jason Bonham in my apartment at that point. He came in and gave me a big, giant hug. I think Richie Zito was doing the Bonham record right after he did the White Lion record, so Jason got to hear that stuff. He was very kind to me after hearing that song, which always meant a lot to me.

Andrew:
The songs from Mane Attraction would appear to translate well to a live setting. What were some of your favorite songs from that record to play live?

Greg:
Well, [“Lights and Thunder”] was definitely one of them. That was a fun song to play. The thing is, is as you make more records, you get to really cherry-pick the songs you’re gonna play for your set. Obviously, we were promoting that record, but there were a lot of cool drum things. “Lights and Thunder” was great to play; “Warsong” was great to play; “She’s Got Everything” was always a great song to play and had a great pocket. The revamped “Broken Heart” was a lot of fun to play. And I honestly don’t remember what else we played off that record live.

Andrew:
The White Lion rhythm section comprised of James LoMenzo and yourself sounded extremely tight. Talk about your relationship with James.

Greg:
We were; I think that it probably came out of really just listening to each other and paying attention to what the other guy was doing. “Oh, you’re gonna do that there? Okay, then I’ll do this here.” We were very close outside of the band as well at that point.

Andrew:
When exactly did you and James leave the band?

Greg:
Well, we left the band at the end of the European Tour. You know, just like anything in life, it kind of just ran its course. James LoMenzo and I were playing with Zakk Wylde at that point, and we had big plans to do something with him.

Andrew:
How was your relationship with Zakk initially formed?

Greg:
Well, on the Big Game Tour, we were supporting Ozzy Osbourne, and we just developed a relationship with Zakk. We would go out, on nights off, to clubs and kind of commandeer the band’s equipment and jam for hours. We did that on a regular basis. When we got back to L.A., it morphed into a band called Lynyrd Skynhead and we spent years playing in and around L.A. Later, we were doing fly-outs; we’d fly out to different venues and play all over the country. And [Lynyrd Skynhead] eventually became Pride and Glory.

Andrew:
I’ve heard differing opinions on this particular topic from several artists, so I wanted to hear your perspective. Did the Grunge movement of the early 1990s extinguish that whole 80s scene?

Greg:
I just think that music and the business can be really sugary sweet; it’s got to have new stuff all the time, and it doesn’t really satiate your appetite like it did in the 70s. Everybody always says that Grunge was the thing that did in quote-on-quote Hair bands or Rock bands of that era, and I think it just kind of got squeezed. I don’t think it stopped it; I think Grunge was its own thing separate and apart from the really guitar-heavy bands of the 80s. But if you really pay attention to what happened, those big stages, and the big light shows, and the sparklers, and the fire and all explosions went to the Country market; all those Country bands started becoming big Rock tour bands. Bands like Nirvana, Pearl Jam, and Soundgarden were more of an intimate kind of setting. So, to say that that’s what really did in rock, not so much. I think it never really went away; it just got a different haircut.

Andrew:
Interesting. The 90s proved to be a tumultuous transitional period for many artists of your era, while others managed to persevere. How did you ride out the remainder of the decade?

Greg:
I opened a recording studio, put my drum sticks down for a little bit, and educated myself on becoming a better recording engineer, which is something I was always interested in doing, and started to produce bands on my own. I spent about a dozen years owning a facility and working out of there. By the time I finished, I had a multi-room facility; I had hosted Michael Jackson, Madonna, Motörhead, hundreds of bands, and had a very good run as a studio owner. When technology changed, when pro tools became prevalent and a lot of the studios started to shift and do different things, I kind of just said, “All right, I don’t think I want to do this anymore.” I closed my commercial facility, sold everything, and went and played with a friend of mine in England named Alex Kane, who was in a band called Life Sex & Death, and I think he was in Enuff Z’Nuff for a while. He had a band out there called Anti Product, and I spent a year touring with him old school, in a van, and just had a wonderful time.

Andrew:
So, did your gig with the Stephen Pearcy Band shorten your stint with Anti Product
?

Greg:
Well, that kind of ran its course. The thing I did with Alex was done purely out of the passion for playing the music; I really liked what he was doing and I really wanted to do it, but it kind of ran its course; I couldn’t continue to do it that way for the rest of my life — as much as I might have wanted to.

I got home, and Stephen lived in my neighborhood. I was walking to get my mail one day, I passed his house, and he was out watering his lawn or something. He goes, “Hey,” and I’m like, “Hey.” We just started chatting, and he asked me if I was interested in coming and playing, and I said sure. And that lasted for about six or seven years, up until a couple of years ago.

Andrew:
Oh, wow. Timing really is everything!

Greg:
Yeah, it’s funny; it’s really a pretty small community when you get right down to it. Everybody pretty much knows everybody; we all go to the same venues and keep our radar out for what the other guy is doing. Through Stephen, I met Carlos Cavazo, and Sean McNabb has been a friend of mine for a long time, so I started playing with Sean and Carlos in Carlos Cavazo’s band Rough Riot. We did two gigs, and then the world locked down, and nothing else has really happened with that as of yet. So, we’ll see where that goes.

The other thing that I’m doing that is taking up a lot of my time is a band called The Legends of Classic Rock that I have with Terry Ilous from Great White and XYZ.

Andrew:
I also wanted to ask you about Rock and Roll Fantasy Camp. What prompted your initial involvement, and how long have you been doing it?

Greg:
I got into Rock and Roll Fantasy Camp through Tony Franklin from The Firm; he brought me into that. He and I had done a session for Warren Huart, who is a producer in town and a very good friend. I told Warren, “Let’s get Tony to do this thing with us. He’s great.” And Tony came in and saved the day for that [session]; he was just a superstar. He recommended me to the people that ran the Fantasy Camp, and they called me up and asked me if I was interested in being one of the counselors – which I absolutely was. It was a lot of work and a lot of satisfaction; it was really a fantastic experience. I highly recommend it to anybody that wants to get any kind of exposure to what it’s really like to be around pro musicians. If you ever had any desire to do that with your life, it’s probably as close as you’re gonna get to a fast track.

Andrew:
Lastly, Greg, and you touched on this a bit earlier, but what’s next on your docket?

Greg:
I have that band Legends of Classic Rock with Terry Ilous; it’s an all-star band with Terry, myself, Sean McNabb, Kevin Jones from Ozzy Osborne’s band, and Danny Johnson from the Rod Stewart band and Steppenwolf. We’re playing a bunch of different kinds of venues – casinos, cruise ships; got a wonderful agent, and we were booked for a solid year. We did one show, and the world locked down. So, we’ve been kind of sitting around and not doing too much as far as the live dates go, but that is quickly coming to a change here. We’re getting more and more inquiries, and we’re starting to fill out our book. So, I am looking forward to getting out and playing with my good friends again. If anybody wants to follow that band, they could do so by going to locrband.com.

Interested in learning more about White Lion? Check out the link below:

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Published by Andrew DiCecco

Predominantly known for his NFL coverage, Andrew DiCecco is a Pennsylvania-based journalist with a profound passion for Rock music and its illustrious history. What initially began as a childhood hobby collecting CDs eventually evolved into a full-blown absorption into the world of Rock and Roll. An aspiring rock historian, Andrew seeks out every autobiography and documentary on Rock artists imaginable to further his knowledge to go along with a growing collection of vintage albums and magazines. Andrew’s musical preferences include, but are not limited to, Def Leppard, Van Halen, AC/DC, Guns N Roses, Metallica, Iron Maiden, Ozzy Osbourne, Scorpions, Foreigner, and Journey. An innate appreciation for guitar heroes, Andrew cites Vito Bratta, Eddie Van Halen, John Sykes, George Lynch, Dave Meniketti, and Neal Schon as some of his personal favorite players. Andrew is also a regular listener to SiriusXM’s Trunk Nation with Eddie Trunk, his primary source of inspiration.

2 thoughts on “An Interview with Greg D’Angelo of White Lion

  1. I really enjoyed your chat with Greg. His history is amazing. I will look for the Legends of Classic Rock on my next cruise!

    1. Thank you! Greg is one of my all-time favorite drummers. Check out the White Lion version of Radar Love. The whole band showcases their chops and Greg has an epic drum solo.

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